9 Annoying Lies Job Interviewers Tell

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Posted November 6, 2012 by Marcy Twete in Career Moves

Have you ever wondered, following an interview, if the things the interviewer told you were true? They say, “We’ll call you” and “You’re terrific,” but are they lying? Yup.

Brazen Careerist tackled this issue of lying hiring managers and HR reps head on with “9 Annoying Lies Job Interviewers Tell.” And they hit the nail on the head big time! Our two favorites: #4 and #9.

4. “We’re working on hiring someone who would help you.”

This might be a red flag that they know the position is overly demanding. Find out why. Will that new person be an assistant or hold a parallel position? What happens if they don’t hire someone; will you be responsible for more than you initially thought?

9. “If this doesn’t work, we’ll keep you in mind for other opportunities.”

The truth is, they probably won’t. Even if they do have something else for you, it may not be what you want.

So keep looking. If it happens to work out, that’s great, but don’t sit around waiting for another position to open up for you.

What else are interviewers lying about? Here’s a few of our own experiences here at CGN:

  • We should know by next week. They never know by next week. Don’t wait by the phone.
  • We’re just starting the process. They say this to buy themselves time. If you hear it, don’t expect to hear from them anytime soon.
  • What kind of salary are you looking for? This question is a lie. What they’re really asking is, “can we afford you?” Do your best to find out the right salary and a fair one before you go in so you won’t price yourself out of the market too early.

No offense to hiring managers and HR reps — it’s okay for them to lie. They’re buying themselves time, they’re saving your feelings, but don’t trust them. They’re lying. Knowing the lies will help you to combat them early and save yourself a whole lot of heartache!


About the Author

Marcy Twete

Marcy Twete is the author of "You Know Everybody! A Career Girl’s Guide to Building a Network That Works" and a career expert who believes in order to be empowered in your career, you must be surrounded with resources and a network that both supports and challenges you. Marcy began her own networking journey as a professional fundraiser in the nonprofit industry, honed those skills as a fundraising consultant, and in 2012 networked her way to nearly 1 million readers as the CEO of the professional development website Career Girl Network.

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