Being “Tapped”

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Posted September 19, 2012 by Marcy Twete in Career Moves

At some point in your career, you’ve likely heard the word “tapped” used to describe a high level individual zeroing in on someone within a company and personally choosing them to lead a project or department. I’ve heard women say, “I was tapped by a member of our C-suite to take on a new project” or “I was tapped to be the representative for the company at an industry conference.” Being “tapped” comes with a great amount of pride — and it should. Someone in power looks at you and says “Yes, that’s the person to lead this very important new thing.”

But what the people throwing around this buzz word aren’t telling you might just be what’s holding you back. You sit around, working hard of course, but waiting…..waiting to be tapped….waiting for someone in your leadership team to choose you and smile on you and make you the star. Isn’t there something backwards about that concept?

Forbes recently published the “10 Traits of Women Business Leaders: They’re Not What You Think” and perfectly addressed this notion of waiting to be tapped. They contend that women who truly lead and get ahead never wait for someone else to tap them for leadership.

Don’t wait to be tapped on the shoulder. This is your career we’re talking about, not a junior high school dance. Research shows over and over again that, too often, women wait to be recognized rather than being proactive in seeking out recognition for their accomplishments. Successful women in business find appropriate ways to summarize their achievements and take credit for their performance.

Therefore, no matter how big the buzzword, don’t sit and wait to get tapped. You are the purveyor of your career, and only you can control your movements within your career. So take control. And don’t wait.


About the Author

Marcy Twete

Marcy Twete is the author of "You Know Everybody! A Career Girl’s Guide to Building a Network That Works" and a career expert who believes in order to be empowered in your career, you must be surrounded with resources and a network that both supports and challenges you. Marcy began her own networking journey as a professional fundraiser in the nonprofit industry, honed those skills as a fundraising consultant, and in 2012 networked her way to nearly 1 million readers as the CEO of the professional development website Career Girl Network.

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