Built In Contingency Plans: Your Lifesaver at Work

1
Posted April 2, 2012 by Marcy Twete in On the Ladder

Effective planning is often what sets men and women apart. When we’re leaving for a trip, my husband packs by throwing a few jeans into a bag the night before. I’ve made a list a week in advance and planned carefully what will make it into my suitcase. And it’s always my husband who realizes he forgot socks or shampoo, not me. Women are, by and large, planners. But at times, it’s our meticulous planning that can leave us grasping at straws.

For years, Sunday nights have been my planning nights. I plan my wardrobe for the week, I review my to-do list and I plan accordingly which tasks I’ll accomplish on which days. Inevitably, though, it rains on a day I planned on wearing wood-bottomed shoes, or it’s freezing cold on a day I didn’t plan on wearing a warm outfit, or a 3 hour meeting gets scheduled last minute and throws off the big project I was planning to do during that time. What I need is a contingency plan for all of my plans.

One of my favorite blogs recently posted an article, “Contingency Planning for Botched Work Days and Deadlines.” Unclutterer says, “The best contingency plan is one where you never need a contingency plan, but deadlines and botched work days are unavoidable in most workplaces.” There, youll find some common contingency plans Unclutterer recommends employing to ensure you’re getting things done even if you’re behind schedule.

Check out their article and then tell me, what are your sure-fire contingency plans at work? What strategies do you consistently employ to ensure you’re ahead of the game?


About the Author

Marcy Twete

Marcy Twete is the author of "You Know Everybody! A Career Girl’s Guide to Building a Network That Works" and a career expert who believes in order to be empowered in your career, you must be surrounded with resources and a network that both supports and challenges you. Marcy began her own networking journey as a professional fundraiser in the nonprofit industry, honed those skills as a fundraising consultant, and in 2012 networked her way to nearly 1 million readers as the CEO of the professional development website Career Girl Network.

One Comment



Leave a Response