Dealing with Anger in the Workplace

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Posted September 5, 2012 by Marcy Twete in On the Ladder

Face it, we all get mad. Your boss skimps on the bonus he promised you and you have visions of slapping her. Or maybe your colleague totally dropped the ball and you end up takin the heat for it. You’d like nothing more than to scream and stomp your feet. But we can all agree that, for the most part, anger in the workplace is both inevitable and inappropriate.

Brazen Careerist takes this topic head on in “3 Questions to Ask Yourself When You Get Mad at Work.”

Their third question is most effective for me. “How would a classy person act right now?” But I’d even take it a step further with these steps for success.

  • First, think of a person you know in a business sense who always seems to be calm and collected. We all know these people. They manage with grace and ease, when you make a mistake they somehow make you feel good about yourself. They would never yell, but can be stern with confidence. Think of this person.
  • Then, take yourself back to a time you’ve gotten mad inappropriately. Ask yourself. How would that person have handled the same situation. Is it possible you could do the same?
  • Finally, keep that person with you in tough situations at work. Ask yourself when you’re about to get heated how they would handle it and do that. If you have to, practice your acting skills. Act just like them.

Sure, you’re going to get mad. And it’s easy to forget your best self in these situations. So instead of looking for your best self, harness the power of someone elses best self. It might just work.


About the Author

Marcy Twete

Marcy Twete is the author of "You Know Everybody! A Career Girl’s Guide to Building a Network That Works" and a career expert who believes in order to be empowered in your career, you must be surrounded with resources and a network that both supports and challenges you. Marcy began her own networking journey as a professional fundraiser in the nonprofit industry, honed those skills as a fundraising consultant, and in 2012 networked her way to nearly 1 million readers as the CEO of the professional development website Career Girl Network.

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