Financial Archetypes: The Innocent

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Posted January 30, 2013 by Kelley Long in Life After Five
innocent

A common financial archetype that I see from Brent Kessel’s book It’s Not About the Money is the Innocent. Innocents, whether they have money or not, have the common thread of being unable to master money. Either they weren’t taught the skills, are confused by money or their natural gifts are not economically valued in our society. Innocents aren’t necessarily against money like Idealists are, they just have a hard time hanging onto it and dealing with it.

Many of the other financial archetypes develop their relationship to money in response to fear, anxiety or frustration. Innocents don’t have a coping strategy, so the pain they feel about their financial situation is often deeper and less obvious for others to see. They might feel like they should have the ability to be better with money, but when it comes down to trying, the response has historically been to shrug and say, “I guess I’m just not good with money.”

Even if they earn a high income, Innocents don’t have the know-how to secure their financial futures, so at the end of the day they find themselves living paycheck to paycheck. Innocents are far more likely to be regular lottery players and fall prey to get-rich-quick schemes, looking for a quick fix. When these endeavors fail, it just adds to their lack of confidence and feelings of inadequacy when dealing with money.

Being innocent doesn’t mean you’re not guilty of hiding from the truth.

Innocents usually spend everything they have and sometimes more, without any idea where the money is going. They are often people with no earnings of their own and depend on a spouse, family members or the government for support, which further adds to their financial distress. The first step of getting their financial house in order is to look at the numbers.

If you’re an Innocent and you don’t know how to look at the numbers, get help. Ask a financially savvy friend or hire a financial coach. Find out where your money is going, then start living within your means immediately. Find ways to simplify your lifestyle so that you can become self-sufficient. Prepare a debt pay-off plan and stick with it. It won’t be easy at first, but ignoring your financial situation won’t make it go away. By paying attention and gaining the skills necessary to be financially independent, you’ll experience a great amount of relief and empowerment. Go, girl!


About the Author

Kelley Long

Kelley Long is a CPA/PFS and CFP® who believes that the true meaning of financial security means having choices in life. Formerly the head of her own practice, KCL Financial Coaching, Kelley parlayed the knowledge and experience gained from starting her own business into her dream job as the Director of Communications and Marketing for the Chicago-based CPA firm Shepard Schwartz & Harris. She’s also a volunteer and media ambassador for Feed the Pig and 360 Degrees of Financial Literacy. In Kelley’s perfect world, everyone would feel great talking about their money concerns, fears, questions and problems, because then everyone would see that we ALL have those concerns, fears, questions and problems. Kelley lives in Chicago where she also teaches BODYPUMP group fitness classes at the Chicago Athletic Clubs.

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