Finding a Career, Not a Job

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Posted April 19, 2013 by Kim Dahlgren in On the Ladder
CareerChange

Finding a Career

No matter who you are or where you come from, getting a job is an essential part of life. In fact, we place so much value on our career that one of the first questions we ask someone upon meeting them is, “What do you do?”  Finding a career is certainly different than having a job, and because we spend such an immense portion of our lives dedicated to our work, finding something we care about, enjoy, and can excel at is important.

We all fall in and out of sometimes arbitrary jobs until we find the one that’s best suited for us, whether it’s due to hours, salary, or skill level. A lot of my career success can be attributed to the process of elimination. You start out with a career goal, sure, but by the time you’ve made some progress you see yourself moving in an entirely different direction. Maybe not completely different, but certainly you might segue way into a new branch of expertise.

The truth is, we often find our passion or life’s work by “failure.” This so-called process of elimination helps you discern what you’re interested in and what you’d rather keep as just another line on your Resume (or not). That’s not to say I haven’t worked hard for each opportunity I’ve been given; I have spent countless hours job hunting to find each perfect position.

Finding a career shouldn’t be all about the hunt through online job sites, it’s not all about making ends meet (but important), and it’s probably not about finding something that requires minimal effort so you can rush home to your TV. Finding a job should not be “finding a job,” but rather finding a career; finding a lifestyle. While work is not play and should not be mistaken as such, we become much more effective at our jobs and much happier in our lives when doing work that interests and fulfills us.

Take some time today to think about what it is you truly want out of your career, and your life. Different paths afford us different luxuries and different difficulties, and just because you’re in need of a job doesn’t mean you should stop looking for a career. Having an end goal is important, but continually pushing ahead to what feels right is how you’ll find true success.

- For more tips just like these, visit Kim’s website http://cakeandclass.com/ -


About the Author

Kim Dahlgren

Kim is a current undergrad student, as well as an Entertainment Reporter in the Los Angeles area. Founder of CakeandClass.Com.

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