Getting Your Resume Noticed

0
Posted September 20, 2012 by Marcy Twete in Building Your Brand

Twenty years ago, getting your resume noticed meant it had to stick out in a pile – a pile of hard copy resumes that recruiters received in the mail with stamps. The resumes that moved to the top of the pile were those on cotton paper with beautiful printing and easily readable. But these days, your paper quality isn’t important. In fact, most resumes don’t even make it to the printer. And if they do, they’re printed on crappy copy paper and thumbed through by an HR assistant, then a manager, and perhaps a hiring manager as well.

So how do you get your resume noticed when you can’t send it in a beautifully pristine manila envelope? Recruiter.com gives step by step tips in “How to Get Your Resume Noticed.” And overall, they’re saying that sticking to simple, straightforward, and well-written resumes are still the way to go. Our favorite tip from Recruiter.com is this – avoid “walls of text.” Here’s what they mean:

Eliminate any large paragraphs of text on your resume.  Too much text can result in your resume receiving a quick skim through, and then being tossed back into the pile. Hiring managers can receive hundreds of resumes a day; they do not have the time or patience to read through masses of text. Just like in an elevator speech, you only have a short window of time to grab your reader’s attention. The text throughout your resume should be clear and concise.

Check out the rest of Recruiter.com‘s article here. They say keep it simple. What do you think?


About the Author

Marcy Twete

Marcy Twete is the author of "You Know Everybody! A Career Girl’s Guide to Building a Network That Works" and a career expert who believes in order to be empowered in your career, you must be surrounded with resources and a network that both supports and challenges you. Marcy began her own networking journey as a professional fundraiser in the nonprofit industry, honed those skills as a fundraising consultant, and in 2012 networked her way to nearly 1 million readers as the CEO of the professional development website Career Girl Network.

0 Comments



Be the first to comment!


Leave a Response