Hillary’s Explanation – Needed?

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Posted May 4, 2012 by Marcy Twete in Leaders We Adore

Last year, the media zeroed in on Hillary Clinton’s “hand over mouth” moment during the Bin Ladin raid. Ridiculous journalists on ridiculous news stations ripped her apart for showing what they called a traditionally female bit of emotion. The men sat stoic while Hillary covered her face. It was incredibly stupid and the kind of news that we’ve always seen about powerful women like Hillary. It’s not fair, it’s not nice, but it’s par for the course.

In the wake of the year anniversary of Bin Ladin’s death, Hillary has commented for the first time on what was happening during this moment. And frankly, when I first saw that she had commented at all, I was a little miffed. Did she really need to? Let’s now bow to their level.

Apparently, during this time, the helicopters were having difficulties and potentially life threatening problems. It was tense, it was scary, and I’m certain it was strange watching something so critical to national security happen from thousands of miles away. But in true Hillary fashion, her comments were pithy and ironic. Hillary says, “That’s how I usually look when my husband drags me to an action movie.”

What can we learn from this moment from Hillary? A great deal. Because the fact is, no matter how much you’re judged or ripped apart by your naysayers, you have to take it with a grain of salt, blow off their crazy comments, and remember who you are. That’s why I love Hillary Clinton, and you should too.


About the Author

Marcy Twete

Marcy Twete is the author of "You Know Everybody! A Career Girl’s Guide to Building a Network That Works" and a career expert who believes in order to be empowered in your career, you must be surrounded with resources and a network that both supports and challenges you. Marcy began her own networking journey as a professional fundraiser in the nonprofit industry, honed those skills as a fundraising consultant, and in 2012 networked her way to nearly 1 million readers as the CEO of the professional development website Career Girl Network.

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