What To Do When Your Favorite Website Crumbles

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Posted May 7, 2013 by Marcy Twete in Networking Buzz
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Admit it, you’ve tried every social media site out there, even the ones that didn’t last. Did you ever have a profile on MySpace? What about Friendster? Are you asking yourself right now, “Does MySpace even exist anymore?” It does! And chances are, if you just stopped using the site, your profile is still there. Even if a website crumbles and goes away (much like Google Reader is about to), have you asked yourself what information of yours is still floating out there on their site?

I was intrigued when CNN writer Heather Kelly posted an article titled “What to do when your favorite site closes.” I was incredibly annoyed with my precious Google Reader lately when they decided to pull the service from Google all together. Fortunately, I’ve found a new love in Feedly (but that’s another story). Heather’s article, though, forced me to think about any other dead or near-dead sites I might  have used in the past. Are you protecting yourself from them?

Here’s what Heather advises you to do when a site you use shuts down:

Delete your profile

Once you’ve extracted all the content you need from a dying site, consider hitting the self destruct button on your profile. Any information left on the service can linger on the Internet for years, and personal information might even be sold off to other companies.

When people abandoned MySpace for Facebook’s greener pastures, many left behind old profiles adorned with what seemed like hysterical photos at the time. Now those people are older, perhaps trying to get jobs or dates, and old MySpace pages still haunt their search results. Unless you remember your password, getting rid of old profile pages can be difficult.

Read the rest of Heather’s advice on how to move on and find alternatives by clicking here.


About the Author

Marcy Twete

Marcy Twete is the author of "You Know Everybody! A Career Girl’s Guide to Building a Network That Works" and a career expert who believes in order to be empowered in your career, you must be surrounded with resources and a network that both supports and challenges you. Marcy began her own networking journey as a professional fundraiser in the nonprofit industry, honed those skills as a fundraising consultant, and in 2012 networked her way to nearly 1 million readers as the CEO of the professional development website Career Girl Network.

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